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From Houseplants to Back Yards: Six Trends That Will Drive Consumer Gardening in 2021

Posted By MNLA eNews, Wednesday, September 30, 2020
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Why the Global Pandemic May Have a “Green Lining”

Posted By MNLA eNews, Wednesday, September 30, 2020
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FINAL REMINDER: 2020 MDA/MNLA Noxious Weed Industry Survey

Posted By James Calkins, MNLA Regulatory Affairs Manager, Friday, September 25, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, September 22, 2020

A quick and final reminder to encourage MNLA members who haven't already done so to participate in the MDA/MNLA noxious weed industry survey that was distributed two weeks ago. The survey closes on September 28 and your input is important and needed. For those who haven't yet completed the survey, please take a few minutes to share your perspectives by clicking on the link below.

Access the MDA/MNLA Survey Here

The original survey notice was distributed on September 10, 2020, as seen here.

Tags:  invasive species  MDA  noxious weeds  regulatory  survey 

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REMINDER: 2020 MDA/MNLA Noxious Weed Nursery Industry Survey

Posted By James Calkins, MNLA Regulatory Affairs Manager, Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Just a quick reminder to encourage Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association (MNLA) members to participate in the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA)/MNLA noxious weed industry survey that was distributed last week. Your participation in this survey is important and provides a valuable opportunity for nursery and landscape professionals to share their perspectives on the designation, regulation, and management of noxious weeds in Minnesota. Several landscape species are being considered for listing as noxious weeds during the current review cycle and it is especially important for us to hear from you regarding the potential regulation of these species as noxious weeds. If you have already completed the survey, we thank you for doing so. And for those who haven't yet completed the survey, please take a few minutes to share your perspectives; the survey can be accessed by clicking the link below.

Access the MDA/MNLA Survey Here
The original survey notice was distributed on September 10, 2020, as seen here.

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Input Needed: Regulation Review of Potential Minnesota Noxious Weeds

Posted By Jim Calkins & Monika Chandler, Thursday, September 10, 2020
2020 MDA/MNLA Noxious Weed Nursery Industry Survey; Please Take a Few Minutes to Participate!

 

TAKE ME TO THE SURVEY NOW

 

The Minnesota Noxious Weed Law directs the Commissioner of Agriculture, in consultation with the Minnesota Noxious Weed Advisory Committee (NWAC), to determine which plants are subject to regulation with the goal of protecting the resources of the State of Minnesota and its residents from the harmful effects of noxious weeds. The law allows Minnesota counties, townships, cities, citizens, and organizations to petition reviews of the invasive potential of terrestrial plants through risk assessment and the listing and regulation of species that are determined to be noxious weeds in the state. In January 2020, the NWAC approved petitions for the review of 16 new species over the next three years (2020-2022) including 13 species that are variously important to the nursery and landscape industry.

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA), Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association (MNLA), and NWAC would like your input regarding the plant species that are being reviewed for potential regulation as noxious weeds during the 2020-2022 review cycle. Since 13 of these species are variously planted in residential and commercial landscapes, and regulation of these species could impact your business and the nursery and landscape industry as a whole, your input is especially needed to accurately gauge the importance of these species to the Minnesota nursery trade as part of the risk assessment process and will be greatly appreciated.

Please visit the survey at Nursery and Landscape Industry Survey 2020 to view the list of species that are being reviewed and provide your input before September 28, 2020, when the survey will close. Please do not hesitate to contact Monika Chandler or Jim Calkins if you have any questions or concerns.

Once again, we appreciate your assistance and look forward to receiving your input.

Respectfully,

Monika Chandler
Noxious & Invasive Weed Program (MDA)
monika.chandler@state.mn.us; 612-327-3857
 
James B. Calkins, Ph.D.
Regulatory Affairs Manager (MNLA)
jim@mnla.biz; 952-935-0682
 

 

Survey Background & Supporting Information

Under the Minnesota Noxious Weed Law (Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 18, Sections 18.75-18.91, the Commissioner of Agriculture (Minnesota Department of Agriculture/MDA), in consultation with the Minnesota Noxious Weed Advisory Committee (NWAC), is responsible for protecting the resources and residents of the State of Minnesota from the harmful effects of noxious weeds. To help fulfill this obligation, the NWAC is charged with conducting plant risk assessments to determine if specific species pose a threat to human or animal health, the environment, agriculture (crops and/or livestock), roads, or other property and recommending whether they should be listed and regulated as noxious weeds in the state. Most recently, six new species were added to the Minnesota Noxious Weed List by the Commissioner of Agriculture in January 2020 and are now being regulated as noxious weeds in Minnesota. With the exception of emergency listings, the NWAC makes recommendations to the Commissioner of Agriculture on a three-year cycle and has approved the following 16 species (in alphabetical order based on scientific name) for review and risk assessment over the next three years (nursery and landscape species are highlighted in bold):

  • Tatarian Maple (Acer tataricum)
  • Hardy Kiwi (Actinidia arguta)
  • Leafy Spurge (Euphorbia esula)*
  • Lesser Celandine (Ficaria verna)
  • Baby’s Breath (Gypsophila paniculata)
  • Honeyberry (Lonicera caerulea)
  • Amur Corktree (Phellodendron amurense)
  • Kudzu (Pueraria montana)
  • Callery Pear (Pyrus calleryana)
  • Castor Bean (Ricinus communis)
  • Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense)
  • Japanese Tree Lilac (Syringa reticulata)
  • Saltcedar/Tamarisk/Tamarix (Tamarix ramosissima)
  • Goldencreeper (Thladiantha dubia)
  • Siberian Elm (Ulmus pumila)
  • Garden Valerian (Valeriana officinalis)

*Note that a risk assessment and listing review have previously been completed for leafy spurge and leafy spurge has been listed as a Prohibited/Control Noxious Weed since 1992. The current review and update of the risk assessment for leafy spurge will include new information on leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) and its subspecies based on recent genetic research.

As a result of these risk assessment reviews, the potential regulatory recommendations and outcomes for these 16 species include not being listed (no regulation) or being listed and regulated as Prohibited/Eradicate, Prohibited/Control, or Restricted Noxious Weeds or as Specially Regulated Plants. These listing categories are defined and regulated as follows:

  • Prohibited/Eradicate Noxious Weeds are non-native plant species that have the potential or are known to be detrimental to human or animal health, the environment, public roads, crops, livestock or other property and are not currently known to be present in Minnesota or are not widely established in the state. These species cannot be propagated, sold, transported, or intentionally planted in Minnesota and existing plants/populations must be eradicated by killing the above and below ground parts of the plant. Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), and black swallow-wort (Cynanchum louiseae) are examples.
  • Prohibited/Control Noxious Weeds are non-native plant species that have the potential or are known to be detrimental to human or animal health, the environment, public roads, crops, livestock or other property and are established throughout Minnesota or regions of the state and would be difficult to impossible to eradicate. These species cannot be propagated, sold, transported, or intentionally planted in Minnesota and existing plants/populations must be controlled to prevent the spread, maturation, and dispersal of all propagating parts (mowing, etc.). Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense), leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), and wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) are examples.
  • Restricted Noxious Weeds are non-native plant species that have the potential or are known to be detrimental to human or animal health, the environment, public roads, crops, livestock or other property and are widely distributed in Minnesota and for which the only feasible means of control is to prevent their spread by prohibiting the importation, sale, and transportation of their propagating parts. These species cannot be sold, transported, or intentionally planted in Minnesota. Garlic mustard ( Alliaria petiolata), crown vetch (Securigera varia), and common/European and glossy buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica and Frangula alnus, respectively) are examples.
  • Specially Regulated Plants may be native species or non-native plant species that have demonstrated economic value, but also have the potential to cause harm because they pose ecological, economic, or human or animal health concerns. Under the Minnesota Noxious Weed Law, Specially Regulated Plants must be handled and managed based on special regulations. Poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), Japanese, giant, and Bohemian knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum, Polygonum sachalinense, and Polygonum x bohemicum, respectively), and Amur maple (Acer ginnala) are examples. In the case of Amur maple, sellers are required to affix a label to the plants that advises buyers to only plant Amur maple and its cultivars in landscapes where the seedlings will be controlled by mowing or other means and at least 100 yards from natural areas (e.g., woodlands, savannas, and prairies).

Thirteen of the 16 species being assessed during the 2020-2022 review cycle (highlighted in bold in the lists above) are variously of special interest to the nursery and landscape industry as regulation of these species (including all cultivars, varieties, and hybrids) could have an impact on individual firms and the nursery and landscape industry as a whole. As a consequence, and with the goal of keeping industry representatives engaged in the review process, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA), the Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association (MNLA), and the Minnesota Noxious Weed Advisory Committee (NWAC) need your input regarding the potential regulation of these species. To this end, all nursery certificate holders should receive an email notice from the MDA seeking input about these species and their potential regulation in the form of a survey accessed through the MDA website. MNLA members that have not received the notice from the MDA, including MNLA members that are not nursery stock growers or dealers and, therefore, are not nursery certificate holders may access the at Nursery and Landscape Industry Survey 2020 and we encourage you to do so and participate in the survey. The survey also includes an opportunity to comment on the other three species that are being reviewed as potential noxious weeds during this review cycle, but are not generally considered to be nursery and landscape species, if you would like to comment.

Your participation in this survey is critical and encouraged as the information provided will be included in the plant risk assessments and considered by the NWAC as it deliberates its recommendations to the Commissioner of Agriculture. The information will also be of interest to the commissioner’s office as they make the ultimate listing and regulatory decisions.

The survey is currently active and will remain open until September 28. As a result, the deadline for completing the survey is September 28, 2020.

In addition to needing your input regarding the sixteen species that are currently being reviewed as potential noxious weeds, remember, too, that 2020 is the first year of the three-year phase-out period for winged euonymus/burning bush (Euonymus alatus; including all named cultivars) which was approved for listing as a noxious weed earlier this year. None of the named cultivars are sterile and all are capable of producing viable seed and being spread to new areas by birds. During this phase out period, winged euonymus/burning bush is listed as a Specially Regulated Plant, but the species will become a Restricted Noxious Weed on January 1, 2023, and will no longer be allowed to be grown or sold in the State of Minnesota at that time.

The complete list of plants that are currently regulated as noxious weeds in Minnesota is available on the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) website at Minnesota Noxious Weed List. Additional information about the MDA Noxious and Invasive Weed Program, the noxious weed review process, and the plants listed as noxious weeds in Minnesota is also available on the MDA website.

The MNLA, MDA, and NWAC are also interested in hearing the perspectives of MNLA members regarding the MDA noxious weed listing process and the regulation of noxious weeds/invasive species in general, and especially relative to landscape species as potential invasive species, in Minnesota. There is an opportunity to submit these types of comments through the survey or you may convey them to the MNLA separately. Knowing your views on these issues will be helpful in the development of MNLA positions relative to specific species and the regulation of noxious weeds/invasive species in Minnesota. Jim Calkins is the MNLA representative on the Minnesota Noxious Weed Advisory Committee (NWAC) and also serves on the NWAC Listing and Management & Policy Subcommittees. If you have questions or concerns about the regulation of noxious weeds/invasive species in Minnesota, and especially species produced and sold in the nursery trade, please do not hesitate to contact Jim at jim@mnla.biz or 952-935-0682 to get your questions answered and share your views and concerns.

Once again, please be sure to participate in the nursery industry noxious weed survey by the September 28 deadline. This is your chance to comment on the nursery and landscape species that are being reviewed for potential listing as noxious weeds during this review cycle and an opportunity to share your views regarding the regulation of noxious weeds/invasive species in Minnesota. We need your input.

James Calkins MNLA Regulatory Affairs Manager jim@mnla.biz; 952-935-0682

Tags:  invasive species  Minnesota Department of Agriculture  noxious weeds  regulatory  survey 

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New LED Requirements Coming Soon for California Growers

Posted By MNLA eNews, Monday, August 31, 2020

Dr. James Calkins offered these comments on this story in Greenhouse Grower:

This is an interesting article about the possibility that California may decide to mandate light-emitting diode (LED) lighting in greenhouse facilities. It is something to be thinking about and watching for in Minnesota (as California goes, so goes the nation; much of the time).

The primary driver is increased energy efficiency in an attempt to mitigate climate change. As indicated in the article, the cost of retrofitting would be very high, but there can also be significant benefits from a production perspective including longer-term energy savings. Reduced cooling costs is highlighted as one of these benefits, and would be true in warmer climates, but the analysis would be more complicated in temperate climates where lighting functions as a partial heat source during the winter and is an important part of the part of the cost/benefit equation that is not addressed in the article. I did a quick search, but have not found anything that specifically addresses the lighting/heating relationship in greenhouses in colder climates. There are clearly many benefits associated with LED lighting in greenhouses and it is certainly possible that any added heating costs could be outweighed by the long-term energy and other savings associated with LED lighting, but this is a factor that should not be overlooked or simply ignored in the analysis. Obviously, we do not know if this type of mandate will become an issue in Minnesota or when it might happen, but this is something that the MNLA and greenhouse growers should be aware of and should probably be thinking about ahead of time.

FOR FULL ARTICLE, CLICK HERE.

Tags:  commercial flower growers  Greenhouse Grower  greenhouse lighting  LED lighting  nursery grower 

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Nitrogen Fertilizer Restrictions Begin on Sept. 1

Posted By Jim Calkins, Regulatory Affairs Manager, Monday, August 10, 2020

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) has distributed a news release to remind farmers that the application of nitrogen fertilizer in the fall and on frozen soil will be restricted in areas vulnerable to groundwater contamination and in Drinking Water Supply Management Areas (DWSMAs) with elevated nitrate levels beginning on September 1, 2020.  The nitrogen fertilizer restrictions are included in the Minnesota Groundwater Protection Rule which became effective on June 24, 2019, and are based on the recommendations included in the Minnesota Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Plan (NFMP; March 2015, Addended July 2019).  The nitrogen fertilizer restrictions are intended to protect groundwater, including groundwater used for drinking water that may be, or has already been, impacted by the 12-13% of Minnesota’s cropland that is vulnerable to groundwater contamination by nitrates from nitrogen fertilizers.

The Groundwater Protection Rule has two parts: Part 1 which restricts the application of nitrogen fertilizer in the fall and on frozen soils in agricultural areas that are vulnerable to groundwater contamination and in protected areas around public wells – Drinking Water Supply Management Areas (DWSMAs) – that have high nitrate levels (nitrate-nitrogen concentrations at or in excess of 5.4 mg/liter), and Part 2 which focuses on public water supply wells with elevated nitrate levels and the protected areas around these wells (the DWSMAs) and includes a combination of voluntary and regulatory efforts designed to mitigate nitrate levels before they exceed the drinking water standard (10 milligrams of nitrate-nitrogen/liter).

Vulnerable groundwater areas include areas where nitrate can move easily through the soil and into groundwater and contaminate drinking water resources including areas with coarse textured soils, karst geology, and shallow bedrock.  Karst geology is dominated by underground fissures and voids that makes them very porous and allows water to move through them rapidly and where contaminants can reach groundwater resources quickly; in Minnesota, karst geology is primarily found in southeastern Minnesota).   Affected agricultural lands can be located on an interactive, online map available on the MDA website that shows the vulnerable groundwater areas and DWSMAs with a resolution down to the individual farm level (see the link below).

Excluding Drinking Water Supply Management Areas (DWSMAs) with nitrate-nitrogen levels greater than or equal to 5.4 mg/liter, several counties that have a low potential for nitrate leaching based on climate (precipitation and evapotranspiration rates), have a short planting season, or have a limited amount of agricultural land (less than 3%) are excluded from the fall nitrogen fertilizer restrictions and there are also a number of state-wide exceptions to the Minnesota Groundwater Protection Rule.  These exclusions and exceptions are outlined in the rule and on the MDA website (see the links below).

The MDA has developed a recorded presentation (YouTube video) that explains the purpose of the Groundwater Protection Rule, where the nitrogen fertilizer restrictions apply, and the exceptions to the rule. This presentation may be accessed through the MDA website at https://www.mda.state.mn.us/groundwater-protection-rule-webinar or directly at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWKYOO0wvfs&feature=youtu.be .  In addition, the MDA will be hosting a webinar on Wednesday, August 12 from 10:00 until 11:00 a.m. to answer questions about the Minnesota Groundwater Protection Rule and the associated nitrogen fertilizer restrictions.

The MDA news release about the nitrogen fertilizer restrictions is available on the MDA website at https://www.mda.state.mn.us/nitrogen-fertilizer-restrictions-begin-september-1.

Additional links to information about the Groundwater Protection Rule:

If you have questions or comments regarding this MNLA Regulatory Update or the nitrogen fertilizer restrictions under the Minnesota Groundwater Protection Rule, contact Jim Calkins, MNLA Regulatory Affairs Manager, at jim@mnla.biz or 952-935-0682.

 

Figure 1.  An example of a fertilizer analysis, specifically a fertilizer that contains 15% nitrogen (8.4% ammoniacal nitrogen and 6.6% nitrate nitrogen) by weight; nitrogen fertilizer restrictions designed to protect groundwater and drinking water resources from contamination by nitrates by restricting the application of nitrogen fertilizers on agricultural lands in the fall and on frozen ground are scheduled to become effective on September 1, 2020 (Photo Credit: James Calkins).


Tags:  fertilizer  MDA  nursery grower  regulatory 

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7 Trends and Takeaways Straight from the Garden

Posted By MNLA eNews, Thursday, July 30, 2020
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Another Invasive Plant Pest – Lily Leaf Beetle – Documented for the First Time in Minnesota

Posted By James Calkins, MNLA Regulatory Affairs Manager, Tuesday, July 14, 2020

On July 13, 2020, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) reported that the lily leaf beetle (Lilioceris lilii; Coleoptera) has been documented for the first time in Minnesota. Also called red lily beetles and scarlet lily beetles, lily leaf beetles are native to Europe and Asia and are believed to have been introduced to North America through Montreal, Canada, in a shipment of lily bulbs from Europe in 1943. The beetle was first documented in the United States in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1992 and has since become a serious pest in the northeastern United States. The Minnesota find was reported by a St. Paul resident who noticed a beetle on an Asiatic lily plant and reported it to MDA staff.

 

Adult lily leaf beetles are distinctly shiny and brick red in color on their dorsal (top) sides and have a black head, legs, and antennae, and a black underside. Interestingly, a “trick” employed by adult beetles to avoid predators is to drop off the plant when disturbed and expose their black underbellies which makes them more difficult to see. Lily leaf beetle adults are good fliers and will reportedly make a squeaky sound when disturbed or squeezed to deter predators.

 

Female lily leaf beetles lay small reddish-brown eggs in irregular rows in groups of about 12 eggs on the undersides of the leaves of susceptible species in the spring (May/June). The eggs hatch in 4-14 days. The larvae immediately begin feeding on the undersides of the leaves and then move on to other parts of the plant after those leaves have been devoured. The small, fat, grublike larvae are typically orange or brown with a distinct, black head, but camouflage themselves with their own feces (sometimes referred to as a “fecal shield”) and look like clumps of greenish-brown debris on the leaves and other plant parts that are being attacked. Feeding damage can be extensive starting with the leaves where the eggs were deposited and spreading to other leaves, stems, flower buds, and flowers. Adults also feed on the same plants, but the larvae are responsible for the most significant damage and entire plants can be reduced to a few partially eaten stems and are weakened significantly. According to Angie Ambourn, Supervisor of the MDA’s Pest Detection Unit, “Both lily leaf beetle adults and larvae chew irregular holes and notches in lily leaves, stems, and developing buds, but larvae cause the most damage to plants and can completely defoliate plants and destroy flowers.” The larvae typically feed for 16 to 24 days before burrowing into the soil to pupate. The pupae are bright orange and are encased in a white cocoon with black spots. The adult beetles emerge 16 to 22 days later and feed on host plants, but do not mate or lay eggs until the following year. The adult beetles overwinter in the soil and in plant debris and immediately begin feeding and searching for mates and the females begin laying eggs soon after they become active in the spring (late April-early June). Only one generation is produced each year, but adults can live for several years and each female beetle typically produces 250-450 eggs.

 

Although differences in susceptibility have been reported, all true lilies (Lilium spp.), including native lilies and introduced garden species, are preferred hosts and are generally subject to attack. Fritillaries (Fritillaria spp.), are also preferred hosts and may also be damaged (especially in the early spring before lilies have emerged), but daylilies (Hemerocallis spp.), canna lilies (Canna spp.), and calla lilies (Zantedeschia spp.), none of which are true lilies, are not bothered. It is also reported that adult beetles may sometimes feed on a number of other plants including hollyhock (Alcea spp.), lily-of-the-valley (Convallaria majalis), hosta/plantain lily (Hosta spp.), flowering tobacco (Nicotiana spp.), Solomon's seal (Polygonatum spp.), bittersweet nightshade (Solanum dulcamara; also called bitter nightshade, European nightshade, and climbing nightshade; a weed introduced from Europe that is common in Minnesota), and potato (Solanum tuberosum). At this time, lily leaf beetles have also been reported in ten other states in the United States including Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin and in seven Canadian provinces including Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In Wisconsin, lily leaf beetle was first discovered near the city of Wausau (Marathon County) near the center of the state in 2014 and has subsequently been documented in 11 additional counties including Dane, Door, Langlade, Lincoln, Oneida, Pierce, Portage, Price, Shawano, Taylor, and Wood Counties.

 

Whether this serious insect pest is present in other places in Minnesota is not known and residents and nursery and landscape professionals are encouraged to be on the lookout for this pest and should report suspected lily leaf lily larvae and beetles to the MDA Arrest the Pest line at arrest.the.pest@state.mn.us or 1-888-545-6684. The insects should be collected, but not transported off site and pictures of the insects will also be helpful for identification purposes. Insects can be frozen in zipper-type polyethylene bags or stored in a small jars of rubbing alcohol or alcohol-based hand sanitizer (which we all have handy these days) for later identification.

 

Lily leaf beetles have no natural enemies in North America, but the beetles are attacked and successfully controlled in Europe by a number of parasitoids including several parasitic wasps. Several of these biological control agents are being investigated as potential controls in the United States.

 

Unfortunately, this is the second major nursery and landscape pest that has been found in Minnesota in the past 12 months – viburnum leaf beetle (Pyrrhalta viburni) last summer and now lily leaf beetle this summer. Let’s hope this isn’t the beginning of a trend. Once again, nursery and landscape professionals are encouraged to be on the lookout for this new plant pest and to report any suspected finds. In addition, always take precautions to avoid introducing and transporting invasive insects and other invasive species to new areas by only sourcing plants and other materials from reputable suppliers and by looking for signs and symptoms of invasive species infestations and practicing good sanitation.

 

The MDA press release entitled Invasive Insect Lily Leaf Beetle Discovered for the First Time in Minnesota is available on the MDA website at https://www.mda.state.mn.us/invasive-insect-lily-leaf-beetle-discovered-first-time-minnesota.

 

Resources:

 

Invasive Species Compendium. Datasheet: Lilioceris lilii (lily leaf beetle); https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/30800 (Accessed July 13, 2020; some good pictures of all life stages and damage)

 

University of Connecticut Home & Garden Education Center. Factsheet: Lily Leaf Beetle - Lilioceris lilii. http://www.ladybug.uconn.edu/FactSheets/lilt-leaf-beetle.php

 

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Factsheet: Lily Leaf Beetle - Lilioceris lilii. https://ag.umass.edu/home-lawn-garden/fact-sheets/lily-leaf-beetle-lilioceris-lilii

 

Liesch, P.J. and L. Johnson. 2020. Lily Leaf Beetle. University of Wisconsin Extension. https://hort.extension.wisc.edu/files/2020/06/Lily_Leaf_Beetle.pdf

 

Minnesota Department of Agriculture. Lily Leaf Beetle. https://www.mda.state.mn.us/plants-insects/lily-leaf-beetle

 

Minnesota Department of Agriculture. 2019. Invasive Insect Viburnum Leaf Beetle Discovered for the First Time in Minnesota. https://www.mda.state.mn.us/invasive-insect-viburnum-leaf-beetle-discovered-first-time-minnesota

 

 

 

If you have questions or comments regarding this MNLA Regulatory Update or the status of lily leaf beetle in Minnesota, contact Jim Calkins, MNLA Regulatory Affairs Manager, at jim@mnla.biz; 952-935-0682.

Tags:  invasive species  lily leaf beetle  MDA  regulatory 

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Optimism in the Face of a Pandemic

Posted By MNLA eNews, Friday, June 19, 2020
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